In December, the men and women of the District joined wonder-woman Cath Skroch and newly launched Peace Meals for a Dinner Party first: cooking class. Our goal? To arm ourselves with know-how and nutrients to heal both mind and body, tackling head-on the low energy, impaired focus, recurring impacts on appetite, and other sordid sensations that often accompany loss. On the menu: salad with roasted broccoli and goat cheese, a lentil and quinoa combo, walnut-crusted salmon, banana custard and macaroons, and naturally, our staple bottle (or two or several) of fine red. A few facts discovered over the course of the evening: * When combined, calcium and magnesium – found in cheese and dark leafy greens, respectively  – act as a natural calming agent.   * The complex carbs found in raw vegetables produce serotonin, the “feel-good” neurotransmitter known for easing tension. (Hint: serotonin can also be stimulated with tryptophan, found in walnuts, tofu, dairy and bananas).  * Protein is the natural world’s best long-term fatigue-fighter. Iron (found in figs, quinoa, tahini, and other delectables) packs a fine punch, too.  * Salmon and tofu contain tyrosine, which stimulates dopamine and norepinephrine, which boost energy and mental clarity. * Egg yolks are a rich source of folic acid, one of the biggest influencers on mood. But you can keep the whites, which are dense with high-quality protein and B vitamins, helping combat stress and maintain a healthy nervous system.  The result? Delicious. The company? Supreme. The conclusion? Before reaching for the vitamin cabinet or the pill-box, we’ll try the stove instead. “To eat is a necessity. To eat intelligently is an art,” said French writer La Rochefoucauld. We couldn’t agree more.  For more, email PeaceMealsDC@gmail.com. 

In December, the men and women of the District joined wonder-woman Cath Skroch and newly launched Peace Meals for a Dinner Party first: cooking class. Our goal? To arm ourselves with know-how and nutrients to heal both mind and body, tackling head-on the low energy, impaired focus, recurring impacts on appetite, and other sordid sensations that often accompany loss.

On the menu: salad with roasted broccoli and goat cheese, a lentil and quinoa combo, walnut-crusted salmon, banana custard and macaroons, and naturally, our staple bottle (or two or several) of fine red.

A few facts discovered over the course of the evening:

When combined, calcium and magnesium – found in cheese and dark leafy greens, respectively  – act as a natural calming agent.  

The complex carbs found in raw vegetables produce serotonin, the “feel-good” neurotransmitter known for easing tension. (Hint: serotonin can also be stimulated with tryptophan, found in walnuts, tofu, dairy and bananas). 

Protein is the natural world’s best long-term fatigue-fighter. Iron (found in figs, quinoa, tahini, and other delectables) packs a fine punch, too. 

Salmon and tofu contain tyrosine, which stimulates dopamine and norepinephrine, which boost energy and mental clarity.

Egg yolks are a rich source of folic acid, one of the biggest influencers on mood. But you can keep the whites, which are dense with high-quality protein and B vitamins, helping combat stress and maintain a healthy nervous system. 

The result? Delicious. The company? Supreme. The conclusion? Before reaching for the vitamin cabinet or the pill-box, we’ll try the stove instead.

“To eat is a necessity. To eat intelligently is an art,” said French writer La Rochefoucauld. We couldn’t agree more. 

For more, email PeaceMealsDC@gmail.com. 

Posted on January 9, 2012 .